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This Week in Rockland: Newspaper Excerpts: Flashback Friday: Week of August 28

2020-08-28 TWIR Image - Babe Ruth

August 27, 1870 150 YEARS AGO
Rockland County Journal

FRUIT
       Several years ago, the people of Nyack could justly boast of being able to raise the greatest variety of choice fruits that ever found their way to a New York market. Latterly however, owing to spring rains and dampness, worms, insects, and two causes unknown, supply from here has grown very limited. And the receipts, to our fruit growers has scarcely remunerated them for their trouble.
       This year promises to be an exception to the last three or four, so far as pears and grapes are concerned, for the reason that both the trees and vines are literally loaded with their golden and purple products. The Bartlett and Seckel pears are the favorites, and scores, if not hundreds, of baskets are daily shipped to market. Already our grapes are turning purple and in 10 days more some early varieties will be ready for market. The finest and largest crop of Delaware grapes we have seen this year is to be found on the premises of John W. Tout, who has also raised an immense crop of the Bartlett pears. From present indications late varieties of the apple do not promise to be abundant.

LIGHT UP
       The citizens residing on that portion of First Avenue between Broadway and Grove Street, have, during the last week, been doing something worthy, to the emulation of those who live in darkness in other portions of our village. They have caused two new gas lamps to be set, and the same are lighted every night, making the street one of the most cheerful in our village. If this example were followed by others, how much more secure would pedestrians feel as they wend their way homeward on a dark night?

August 27, 1920 100 YEARS AGO
Rockland News

FANS TURN OUT TO SEE “BABE” RUTH – BIG CROWD AT HAVERSTRAW TO GREET BASEBALL STAR – HOME RUN KING DID MANY STUNTS BEFORE THE CAMERA FOR THE NEW MOVIE “HEADIN’ HOME”
       Many Rockland County baseball fans gathered in Haverstraw Sunday to greet “Babe” Ruth, The Home Run King and the great Yankee star in action.
       Ruth’s invasion in Haverstraw was to do certain stunts before the movie camera for the new picture “Headin’ Home” in which he is the star. “Babe” walked through several Haverstraw streets, followed by a crowd of admirers, to Eckerson field where he took part in a baseball game between the Knights of Columbus team of Haverstraw and Highland Hose team of Nyack.
       First, Ruth played in the outfield, then he went to bat and knocked out three home runs in quick succession. One ball that he hit landed on top of a house across the street from the outfield, the next ball landed in the yard of the same house, and the third went entirely over the house.
       The balls were recovered by small boys and were autographed by Ruth.
       After Ruth had gone through the required number of stunts, he said goodbye to the crowd, jumped into a waiting car and was taken to the United States hotel where he changed his clothes. He was then driven to New York where he took part in a regular game on the Polo Grounds.

VOTES FOR WOMEN IN 1920 WINS — WASHINGTON AND TENNESSEE LEGISLATURES RATIFY THE SUSAN B. ANTHONY AMENDMENT, THUS GIVING THE NECESSARY THIRTY-SIX STATES OUT OF FORTY-EIGHT
Victory Crowns Seventy Years of Persistent Struggle by Devoted Champions


Note: The “Babe” Ruth story appeared on the front page; the Votes for Women story appeared on page 4.

August 26, 1970 50 YEARS AGO
The Journal News

‘LIB DAY’ FALLS FLAT HERE
          If Rockland County women are breaking their normal daily routines to celebrate the 50th anniversary of women's suffrage, they're keeping their activities well hidden.
          Betty Friedan, author of “The Feminine Mystique” and organizer of the National Organization of Women (NOW), asked women to stay home from work today as a protest against women’s inferior position in a male-dominated society.
          Rockland employers with large female staffs said this morning that they noticed no unusual absentee rates.
          No plans for public demonstrations by Rockland women have been publicized.
          Spokesmen for Lederle Laboratories, Avon, and Orange and Rockland Utilities, which employ a total of about 1,800 women, said this morning that their early-morning checks showed only normal absenteeism.
           An O&R representative said the general feeling there is that “women are liberated,” and that therefore there is no reason for a strike.
           Another company's spokesman, a male who asked to remain anonymous, said that while his wife failed to kiss him goodbye this morning, the women at work seemed to be the same as usual.
          One male employee at a firm relying heavily on women workers commented that in Rockland, “either there is no large support of Women's Lib . . . or those who do support it are not employed.”

SUFFERN POST OFFICE ROBBED
          The entire stamp stock of the Suffern Post Office and an undetermined amount of money were stolen sometime between 8 p.m. yesterday and 3:30 a.m. today, village postal officials said this morning.
           The officials were unable to estimate the amount of the loss, but an unofficial source said the amount could be as much as $25,000.
           Suffern Postmaster Thomas J. Byrnes said the theft showed signs of being a professional Job, done by “people (who) really knew what they were doing.”
           He said an investigation by New York City postal authorities is underway.
           Byrnes said he was trying to obtain stamps for his customers and that he hoped to be back in business by noon today.
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This Week in Rockland (#FBF Flashback Friday) is prepared by Clare Sheridan on behalf of the Historical Society of Rockland County. To learn about the HSRC's mission, upcoming events or programs, visit www.RocklandHistory.org or call (845) 634-9629.


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