Research

This Week in Rockland: Newspaper Excerpts: Flashback Friday: Week of January 28

2022-01-28 TWIR Image-Bergerfolk

January 27, 1922 – 100 YEARS AGO
Nyack Evening Journal

LONE NYACKER CROSSED THE ICE TO TARRYTOWN TODAY — SALESMAN L. HUNT PERFORMED THAT STUNT — SIXTH AVENUE MAN MADE JOURNEY ALONE IN ONE AND ONE HALF HOURS — SAID ICE WAS SIX INCHES THICK BUT SAW SEVERAL AIR HOLES ON TARRYTOWN SIDE
       Crossing the Hudson River on the ice from Nyack to Tarrytown was the daring but successful feat accomplished by Leonard L. Hunt, of Sixth Avenue, Nyack, salesman in this territory for the Sunshine Biscuit Co. Hunt made the journey in one hour and a half and arrived at Tarrytown in time to catch the ten o’clock train to Poughkeepsie, after he had been shaved in a Tarrytown barber shop.
        Immediately after Hunt arrived in Tarrytown, the Journal received the message that a Nyack man had walked across the river. A representative of the Journal in Tarrytown got busy at once and located Mr. Hunt in a barber shop in that village before he boarded the train for Poughkeepsie. Mr. Hunt related his story, which was not as exciting as one would expect forthe river is frozen harder over the channel than even the ordinary tourist might anticipate, despite the fact that the ice in the channel is said by rivermen here to have closed for the first time late yesterday afternoon. But Mr. Hunt says it had an average thickness of about six inches. He tested the ice in several places before venturing farther and farther toward the channel and found it to be safe, apparently, but he noticed several air holes in the surface, particularly on the Tarrytown side, and advises anyone who braves the trip to stay considerably south of the Tarrytown lighthouse.
       Mr. Hunt left home this morning and for fear of frightening his wife he did not tell her that possibly he might attempt to cross to Tarrytown on the ice. He had an important business engagement in Poughkeepsie and because he could get to that city quicker providing he could get across the river to Tarrytown was his reason given for crossing the ice rather than to go via West Shore Railroad to Newburgh and then across on the ferry to get to Poughkeepsie. He stated that he expected to walk back on the ice from Tarrytown to Nyack this afternoon providing he found the river safe to make the journey.
       It is over three miles across the river from Nyack to Tarrytown and this is the first time since the winter of 1918–19 that has that it has frozen over. At that time taxi service was maintained from Nyack to Tarrytown on the ice for a period of six weeks.
       Mr. Hunt was careful in crossing the river today. He performed an unusual feat, no doubt; however, the Journal hopes that no one will emulate his example by venturing to cross to Tarrytown unless it is evident that the ice is perfectly safe to travel on. It is thawing slightly today, and no chances should be taken.

January 26, 1972 – 50 YEARS AGO
Rockland Independent/Leader

BERGERFOLK GROOVE IN STEREO
       The Bergerfolk, Rockland’s own folk singing family, are used to the glamor of show business.
       They’ve been in the profession for the past eight years and have come a long way from the days when they performed at the Finkelstein Library in Spring Valley.
       Although the seven Bergers still perform at the library, they have widened their range of influence considerably. The stage has increased from Rockland to the world.
       One would think that the Bergerfolk have conquered just about every mountain. But there was one left that the family has just recently climbed. The Stephen Berger family’s first solo record album was released January 10.
       Titled “The Bergerfolk Sing for Joy,” the album features many original songs, written by Mrs. Berger.
       “We’ve been on albums of Tradition Records,” she said. “But it was always as a part of a folk singing festival with other performers. This is our own album.”
       Although the experience was a new and exciting one, the Berger clan did not find it a nervous one. Accustomed to performing before millions on television and radio, they took the whole thing in stride.
       But Mrs. Berger does admit to getting a little thrill when she hears the album played on radio stations.
       “Singing live is the best. But many people want something to take home and play. Now they can with the album. It’s strange and nice to hear it on the radio, though. When I see it on sale in the stores and see people buying it and taking it home, I get a thrill.”
       Songs on the album include “I’ll Fly Away,” “Day is Done,” “Jesse James,” and Mrs. Berger’s “Plastic Grass.” There are 14 songs in all, three in which the youngest Berger, four-year-old Emily, solos.
       “In a way, the whole thing really is exciting,” Mrs. Berger confessed. “It’s the ultimate goal of every artist or performer to cut an album. The record has played in California, St. Louis, Minnesota, and who knows where else. I can’t keep track anymore!”
       But the world sure seems to be keeping track of the Bergerfolk.
_____

This Week in Rockland (#FBF Flashback Friday) is prepared by Clare Sheridan on behalf of the Historical Society of Rockland County. To learn about the HSRC’s mission, upcoming events or programs, visit www.RocklandHistory.org or call (845) 634-9629.


Comments:

Add a Comment:

Please signup or login to add a comment.